CHEESE PLEASE

FullSizeRender.jpgIt’s become an annual tradition to start the new year off with Raclette. Yes, you must love cheese and lots of it – but oh my, it is ever good!

I first had Raclette years ago in Annecy, France a nearby town where Xavier is from. I loved it immediately and of course wanted to have raclette here in the states. So….we bought our own raclette machine (funny, we actually travel with it sometimes) and usually serve it several times a year, normally starting off right after the new year.

The origins of Raclette are from Switzerland – with Raclette actually being a type of semi-hard cows milk cheese. The cheese is most commonly used as a half wheel which is then melted under a heated lamp, then scraped (RACLER=to scrape) onto a plate. This melted goodness is traditionally served with small boiled potatoes, cornichons, and a variety of dried meats such as jambon cru, salami and viande des Grisons.

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Also, this year back by popular demand was Xavier’s infamous French onion soup.  Oh Lordy is this ever good.  It was nice that he served them in the mini Staub Cocotte’s – a perfect size before having Raclette.  We just LOVE using our Staub which originates in Alsace France.  My favorite feature is the black cast-iron matte finish which is non-stick and really is easy to clean.  Trust me – I do a lot of dishes….!!   You can purchase Staub at Williams Sonoma, which they currently have on  sale “here” .  They come in a variety of beautiful colors so it makes it hard to choose.  For a complete profile on Staub, you can view the entire line “here”.

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